Marijuana helps to restore appetite with THC, which once introduced to the body, inhibits the production of leptin in the hypothalamus, thereby increasing caloric intake and decreasing weight loss in the short term. In the long term, this effect is more noticeable. The body's reaction to leptin is much different to the effect of THC; THC increases appetite by disrupting the metabolic network, whereas leptin affects appetite by promoting fat metabolism. The effects of the two compounds on hunger and food intake are nearly the same. You can get all the details over at Weed Seeds USA.

Marijuana can enhance appetite as the CB1 receptors on the appetite centers in the brain are decreased by marijuana's psychoactive properties. This is consistent with studies showing that THC significantly decreases the number of CB1 receptors, which are involved in regulating appetite. However, cannabinoid receptors are still present in the brain and may play a role in controlling appetite, or marijuana may play a role in increasing food intake and reducing appetite in the long term.

Alcohol & the Metabolism of Energy Depends on How the Brain Receives the Alcoholic Drink

Because we have a different ability to process alcohol from a brain reward mechanism, there is no one mechanism that can explain the long term consequences of drinking alcohol. Our brains respond differently to alcohol depending on how it's consumed, and drinking behavior is influenced by the different mechanisms and the individual's genetic makeup. That is why it's important to pay attention to the details in your research. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA) has done an excellent job of collecting the many different studies related to alcohol addiction and their conclusions. For example, NIAAA reports that more than 40 different studies report that alcoholism is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain that results from an imbalance of neurotransmitters in the brain. This imbalance causes many different symptoms of alcoholism, including irritability, anger, and anxiety. Many people believe the brain can "repair" itself, but the evidence clearly indicates that the brain can only repair itself with regular and sustained alcohol abstinence. For example, as discussed in Chapter 6, "Alcoholism and Addiction: What Is the Evidence?" alcoholics often show several different brain abnormalities, including white matter lesions, brain shrinkage, and decreased neuronal connections. Studies show that it is most common for alcoholics to show a loss of 30% to 50% of their hippocampal volume, and many alcoholics also show brain shrinkage and a reduced density of nerve cells. The brains of alcoholics show a decreased response to chemical inhibitors of neurotransmitter synthesis (e.g. norepinephrine and serotonin). Although all people experience these brain changes from time to time, they are usually associated with chronic alcohol abuse, such as excessive drinking.

Alcoholics often exhibit several different brain abnormalities, including white matter lesions, brain shrinkage, and decreased neuronal connections. Studies show that it is most common for alcoholics to show a loss of 30% to 50% of their hippocampal volume, and many alcoholics also show brain shrinkage and a reduced density of nerve cells. The brains of alcoholics show a decreased response to chemical inhibitors of neurotransmitter synthesis (e.g. norepinephrine and serotonin). Although all people experience these brain changes from time to time, they are usually associated with chronic alcohol abuse, such as excessive drinking. Alcoholics often exhibit several different brain abnormalities, including white matter lesions, brain shrinkage, and decreased neuronal connections.

The hippocampus is an almond-shaped brain structure that serves as a part of memory. The hippocampus is also known as the