A Clash of Culture at Dallas’ Second Thought Theatre

The second show in Chris La Bove and Steve Walter’s Second Thought Theatre’s season is a combination of theater and film presented in conjunction with Aviation Cinemas, Inc., the operating company for the ultra-cool Texas Theatre in Oak Cliff.

Eric Steele’s The Midwest Trilogy, in a not surprising vein for Dallas theater, presents a critique of Midwest culture through three brief vignettes. Each mini-play presents issues characteristically associated with the stereotypically backwards folk of the middle of the country, which yes, includes Dallas. Where Steele surprises however, is in his ability to overturn our assumptions and in the process, create a memorable piece of theater.

In the first (and weakest) “act,” entitled “Cork’s Cattlebaron,” Jon and Brady sit down for a meal at a fancy Omaha steakhouse. Brady’s incessant chatter is obnoxious and the audience commiserates with the younger Jon who seems utterly embarrassed by his business associate's brash manner.

Eric Steele

After several minutes of agony Jon snaps, and instead of any number of accusations one might assume Jon would lash out with, he fires Brady on the spot; a task he had apparently been attempting to accomplish all night. Despite an initial lack of respect for Brady’s unsympathetic character, the audience finds itself sorry for Brady as he leaves a painfully emotional voicemail for his wife.

After we travel to Omaha, Steele takes us to “Topeka” in a film where young New York businessman Layne Edelman encounters a group of locals in a coffee shop. In this short film Layne tackles the perceived prejudices of the Kansans as he chats with his fellow customers.

Typical issues of city versus country and the assumptions and stereotypes that pervade the relationship appear but the audience is never quite sure whether the group is indeed predisposed to dislike Layne because of where he comes from and his religion, or if the bias is all in Layne’s head. The dramatic ending again turns our assumptions upside down as it would appear that Layne is the one placing too much stock in a societal narrative, rather than vice versa.

The third and final installment of The Midwest Trilogy is Bob "Birdnow," the only live action portion of the saga, here directed by Lee Trull. Dallas audiences saw Barry Nash as Bob Birdnow in last year’s Festival of Independent Theater and Nash excellently reprises his role here. Second Thought and Aviation Cinemas, Inc. plan to turn this portion of the Trilogy into a film as well.

Barry Nash as Bob Birdnow - Photo Credit Karen Almond

Birdnow is a “reluctant motivational speaker” who relates to the audience, acting as a group of salesmen at a conference, the story of a dramatic plane crash and his survival. While serving as a critique of the practice of rote motivational speaking, this section of the play also toys with the notion that human existence is based solely upon survival. Nash’s acting is emotional, raw and excluding the plane crash, utterly relatable.

Second Thought is preaching to the choir with this production of Steele’s work. Steele stated he received inspiration for these stories from his days as a “traveling salesman” in the American Midwest, a career in which a pervasive isolation lends itself to ample time for observation.

The stories in the Trilogy are based on circumstances he was confronted with and the stereotypes, narrative of the “culture clash” and the danger of buying too much into either, are ideas anyone even remotely familiar with this area of the country will be able to relate to oh so well. Go see it. You’ll see what I mean.

The Midwest Trilogy runs through April 9 and Second Thought Theatre performs at Bryant Hall at the Kalita Humphries Theater in Turtle Creek. For more information visit www.secondthoughtheatre.com.

4 Responses to “A Clash of Culture at Dallas’ Second Thought Theatre”

  1. “Reluctant motivational speaker” - that's funny. I'm a motivational speaker that's afraid of public speaking.

  2. “Reluctant motivational speaker” - that's funny. I'm a motivational speaker that's afraid of public speaking.

  3. Education is a ladder to go upward to the heights of success. It supports an individual to achieve the targets of life to become successful and useful member of society. It helps in growing and promoting himself in professional career.

  4. Well I am from a country where there are a lot of cultures in every corner, it is always great to experience new culture and to be a part of it even if for a short while. It would be something great and worth spending in life.

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